Minuteman Salsa

minute-man-salsa-jar.jpg

This just confuses me.

Why was Minuteman Salsa started?
While watching TV coverage of a pro-illegal immigration rally, we realized the salsa we had been consuming was at odds with our values. After a bit of research, we learned that most salsa was made outside the United State by companies that value profits over patriotism and who contribute to flood of illegal immigration by employing foreign workers and using foreign produce. We weren’t going to compromise our values, and sure as heck weren’t going to stop eating salsa, so we had to create an alternative. Thus, Minuteman Salsa – America’s Patriotic Salsa was born.

Foreign companies using foreign workers and foreign produce? Bastards! Is it safe to assume that this is a joke?

(via Slashfood)

Minuteman Salsa

minute-man-salsa-jar.jpg

This just confuses me.

Why was Minuteman Salsa started?
While watching TV coverage of a pro-illegal immigration rally, we realized the salsa we had been consuming was at odds with our values. After a bit of research, we learned that most salsa was made outside the United State by companies that value profits over patriotism and who contribute to flood of illegal immigration by employing foreign workers and using foreign produce. We weren’t going to compromise our values, and sure as heck weren’t going to stop eating salsa, so we had to create an alternative. Thus, Minuteman Salsa – America’s Patriotic Salsa was born.

Foreign companies using foreign workers and foreign produce? Bastards! Is it safe to assume that this is a joke?

(via Slashfood)

Group wants to reconcile dinosaurs, Bible

Another theory about the dinosaurs from Seventh-day Adventists:

When confronted with questions from her middle school students about dinosaurs, Seventh-day Adventist teacher Laurel Baker says she usually skirts the issue and changes the subject.

Seventh-day Adventists believe in a literal six-day creation of the world described in the biblical book of Genesis. It’s written there that God created Adam and Eve and the animals of the earth on the same day — about 6,000 years ago, according to many Seventh-day Adventists.

Most mainstream scientists believe dinosaurs existed hundreds of millions of years ago, predating the evolution of human beings.

Now, however, some in the denomination are making new efforts to reconcile these contrary beliefs by asserting that many of the techniques and assumptions of science are simply flawed.

Scientists date dinosaur fossils using “the distribution of isotopes, but those processes have very little to do with time,” said geologist Elaine Kennedy, who has spent her career examining dinosaur eggs and nests and now serves as adjunct professor at Southwestern Adventist University in Keene, Texas. “You’re talking about phenomenon that can happen very quickly.”

Such dating, she said, doesn’t take into account the impact of the cataclysmic flood recounted in the Bible, for example.

Kennedy believes that dinosaurs were created during Biblical times, thousands rather than millions of years ago.

Interesting. Please, continue:

At a standing-room-only workshop called “The Dirt on Dinosaurs: Created or Evolved,” David Stair told about 150 participants that God created dinosaurs on the sixth day of creation, when the Bible says: “And God made the beasts of the earth according to their kinds and the cattle according to their kinds, and everything that creeps upon the ground according to its kind.”

Contrary to traditionally accepted science, dinosaurs roamed the earth along with humans until the great flood recounted in the Bible killed all living things that did not board Noah’s ark, he said.

It’s possible that some dinosaurs were small enough to enter the ark and survive, only to be killed by the great climactic changes that followed, said Stair, principal of Joshua Adventist Multigrade School in Joshua, Texas. A baby T-Rex, for example, was probably small enough to fit on a person’s shoulder.

And that my fellow cynics, is comedy!
(via J-Walk)

War Crimes Act Changes Would Reduce Threat Of Prosecution

From WaPo:

The Bush administration has drafted amendments to a war crimes law that would eliminate the risk of prosecution for political appointees, CIA officers and former military personnel for humiliating or degrading war prisoners, according to U.S. officials and a copy of the amendments.

Officials say the amendments would alter a U.S. law passed in the mid-1990s that criminalized violations of the Geneva Conventions, a set of international treaties governing military conduct in wartime. The conventions generally bar the cruel, humiliating and degrading treatment of wartime prisoners without spelling out what all those terms mean.

The draft U.S. amendments to the War Crimes Act would narrow the scope of potential criminal prosecutions to 10 specific categories of illegal acts against detainees during a war, including torture, murder, rape and hostage-taking.

Left off the list would be what the Geneva Conventions refer to as “outrages upon [the] personal dignity” of a prisoner and deliberately humiliating acts — such as the forced nakedness, use of dog leashes and wearing of women’s underwear seen at the U.S.-run Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq — that fall short of torture.

NY Times Uncovers AOL Searcher No. 4417749

From the NY Times:

Buried in a list of 20 million Web search queries collected by AOL and recently released on the Internet is user No. 4417749. The number was assigned by the company to protect the searcher’s anonymity, but it was not much of a shield.

No. 4417749 conducted hundreds of searches over a three-month period on topics ranging from “numb fingers” to “60 single men” to “dog that urinates on everything.”

And search by search, click by click, the identity of AOL user No. 4417749 became easier to discern. There are queries for “landscapers in Lilburn, Ga,” several people with the last name Arnold and “homes sold in shadow lake subdivision gwinnett county georgia.”

t did not take much investigating to follow that data trail to Thelma Arnold, a 62-year-old widow who lives in Lilburn, Ga., frequently researches her friends’ medical ailments and loves her three dogs. “Those are my searches,” she said, after a reporter read part of the list to her…

…Ms. Arnold, who agreed to discuss her searches with a reporter, said she was shocked to hear that AOL had saved and published three months’ worth of them. “My goodness, it’s my whole personal life,” she said. “I had no idea somebody was looking over my shoulder.”