Rape victim denied morning-after pill

From The Patriot News:

A Good Samaritan Hospital emergency room doctor refused to give a rape victim a morning-after pill because he said it was against his Mennonite religion.

Rebuffed by the doctor, the woman called her gynecologist, who wrote the prescription. Her local pharmacy told her it was out of the drug and referred her to a sister store in Reading.

The former medical director of the hospital said he sees nothing strange about asking a woman from eastern Lebanon County to drive to Reading for a drug.

(via What Really Happened)

Dad Breathes Air Into Son Trapped Underwater For 7 Minutes

From Local6.com:

ORLANDO, Fla. — A 14-year-old who was sucked to the bottom of a hotel hot tub and kept under water for at least seven minutes was likely saved by air his father breathed into his mouth during the ordeal.

Aljuwon Pipkin, who was visiting Walt Disney World from New Jersey, became stuck at the bottom of the hot tub last Thursday at the Radisson Parkway Hotel.

Officials said a grate at the bottom of the tub apparently broke and created a strong suction that pulled the teen underwater.

Pipkin’s father was at the pool and noticed his son stuck at the bottom of the hot tub.

“I get chills now even speaking about it,” father Sharif Pipkin said. “I was truly a traumatic moment. I figured he was at the bottom and they just couldn’t pull him up and then he didn’t come up. And, I pulled again and he didn’t come up. I began to holler for help from people.”

As people jumped in to pull the teen from the bottom of the tub, Pipkin’s father jumped in and began to breathe air into his son’s mouth, the report said.

Mark Twain’s Review of the Book of Mormon

From Twain’s “Roughing It”

The book seems to be merely a prosy detail of imaginary history, with the Old Testament for a model; followed by a tedious plagiarism of the New Testament. The author labored to give his words and phrases the quaint, old-fashioned sound and structure of our King James’s translation of the Scriptures; and the result is a mongrel — half modern glibness, and half ancient simplicity and gravity. The latter is awkward and constrained; the former natural, but grotesque by the contrast. Whenever he found his speech growing too modern — which was about every sentence or two — he ladled in a few such Scriptural phrases as “exceeding sore,” “and it came to pass,” etc., and made things satisfactory again. “And it came to pass” was his pet. If he had left that out, his Bible would have been only a pamphlet.