Travel Guide to India

I don’t know how true these are, but they are entertaining.

Wear goggles when taking a taxi and hold your breath. This way, your driver will fear you and give you a better rate (and it helps to survive the busier parts of the road).

Drink your tea quickly. The trick is to never let anyone see you do it. You should go from a full cup of tea to pacing the room with an empty cup without missing a step. The last guy to have tea in his cup is (a) a loser and (b) stuck as the dude trying to clean up after you stare him down.

If having trouble crossing the street, find a cab and offer him Rs. 10 to take you across. Safety is worth $0.25.

When the power goes off, pretend that it is still on. DO press the elevator button and look impatient. DO NOT skip a beat in your conversation. First person to pause loses. Only dorks get worried that the power won’t come back on.

(via del.icio.us/rajas)

Baby Got Back in Latin

HA!

magnae clunes mihi placent, nec possum de hac re mentiri.
(Large buttocks are pleasing to me, nor am I able to lie concerning this matter.)
quis enim, consortes mei, non fateatur,
(For who, colleagues, would not admit,)
cum puella incedit minore medio corpore
(Whenever a girl comes by with a rather small middle part of the body)
sub quo manifestus globus, inflammare animos
(Beneath which is an obvious spherical mass, that it inflames the spirits)

(via del.icio.us/lectrick)

Bush signs debt limit increase to $8.965 trillion

It’s only money.

CLEVELAND (Reuters) –
President George W. Bush on Monday signed into law a $781 billion increase in U.S. borrowing authority, making the
Treasury Department’s new debt limit $8.965 trillion, White House spokesman Scott McClellan said.

Last week, the Senate approved the increase in borrowing authority requested by the Treasury Department to avoid a government default.

Update:

From May 1, 2000:

WASHINGTON (CNN) – President Bill Clinton said Monday that the United States would pay off $216 billion in debt this year, bringing to $355 billion the amount of the nation’s debt paid down in the three years since the government balanced the budget and began running surpluses.

In a written statement, Clinton said the $216 billion payment represented the largest debt paydown in American history, and he said that the federal government’s long-term debt is now $2.4 trillion lower than projected to be when he first took office.

However, the U.S. government still has a long way to go before it pays down the entire national debt, which now stands at $5.7 trillion.