Pay Too Much On Your Credit Card and Homeland Security Steps In

Huh?

They paid down some debt. The balance on their JCPenney Platinum MasterCard had gotten to an unhealthy level. So they sent in a large payment, a check for $6,522.

And an alarm went off. A red flag went up. The Soehnges’ behavior was found questionable.

And all they did was pay down their debt. They didn’t call a suspected terrorist on their cell phone. They didn’t try to sneak a machine gun through customs.

They just paid a hefty chunk of their credit card balance. And they learned how frighteningly wide the net of suspicion has been cast.

After sending in the check, they checked online to see if their account had been duly credited. They learned that the check had arrived, but the amount available for credit on their account hadn’t changed.

So Deana Soehnge called the credit-card company. Then Walter called.

“When you mess with my money, I want to know why,” he said.

They both learned the same astounding piece of information about the little things that can set the threat sensors to beeping and blinking.

They were told, as they moved up the managerial ladder at the call center, that the amount they had sent in was much larger than their normal monthly payment. And if the increase hits a certain percentage higher than that normal payment, Homeland Security has to be notified. And the money doesn’t move until the threat alert is lifted.

The Einstein Hollow Face Illusion

einsteincopy.jpg

Download and watch the video to get the full effect.

This is a 1.5 times life size version of Albert Einstein’s face, since the illusion works best when the head is slightly larger than life size. It is made from a very strong plastic, and is virtually unbreakable. The mask can be stood up in a window and the whole face seems to follow you as you move around the room.

(via del.icio.us/ds_charles)