LEGO Rubberband Chaingun

With video of the chaingun in action:

“The motor driven barrels start winding up to speed at the flick of a switch on the handle. Pulling the trigger unleashes a stream of rubber bands, deluging the target. The fire rate is high enough that at least half a dozen bands are in the air at any one time – the gun appears to fire a single very long chain of them. It’s as much like using a hose pipe as firing a rubber band gun. It also sounds fantastic because each mechanism makes a distinct click as it discharges a rubber band.”

(via Bifurcated Rivets)

HydraCoach Intelligent Water Bottle



The only water bottle
that tells you when you need a drink. This is much better than the archaic system I use now which consists of taking a drink when I am thirsty.

The HydraCoach is the worlds first Interactive Water Bottle. It calculates your personal hydration needs, tracks your real-time fluid consumption, paces you throughout the day and motivates you to achieve and maintain optimal hydration. Our Doctors, Nutritionists and Fitness Trainers all recommend that we drink more water yet there has never been a device to help individuals adhere to the expert’s recommendations. The HydraCoach is the only product of its kind and a breakthrough in personal hydration monitoring.

(via Digg)

10 Most Dangerous Toys of All Time

The Gilbert’s U-238 Atomic Energy Lab comes in at number 2. I bet you are curious as to what toy could be more dangerous than one that comes with a geiger counter.

In 1951, A.C. Gilbert introduced his U-238 Atomic Energy Lab, a radioactive learning set we can only assume was fun for the whole math club. Gilbert, who Americanmemorabilia claims was “often compared to Walt Disney for his creative genius,” had a dream that nuclear power could capture the imaginations of children everywhere. For a mere $49.50, the kit came complete with three “very low-level” radioactive sources, a Geiger-Mueller radiation counter, a Wilson Cloud Chamber (to see paths of alpha particles), a Spinthariscope (to see “live” radioactive disintegration), four samples of Uranium-bearing ores, and an Electroscope to measure radioactivity.