Chelsea Resident Who Found 2nd Bomb Thought It Was ‘Kid’s Science Experiment’

From Gothamist:

The Chelsea woman who found an unexploded bomb outside her home on West 27th Street on Saturday night says she wasn’t alarmed by the discovery, because the device looked so amateurishly benign. Jane Schreibman, a travel photographer, said she had heard the explosion on West 23rd Street, but initially assumed it was thunder. After a friend called to tell her about the blast, which injured dozens of people, she went outside to look around and noticed “a pot on the side of the road” near her home.

The Chelsea woman who found an unexploded bomb outside her home on West 27th Street on Saturday night says she wasn’t alarmed by the discovery, because the device looked so amateurishly benign. Jane Schreibman, a travel photographer, said she had heard the explosion on West 23rd Street, but initially assumed it was thunder. After a friend called to tell her about the blast, which injured dozens of people, she went outside to look around and noticed “a pot on the side of the road” near her home.

Schreibman tells the NY Post, “It looked weird, and I thought it was a kid’s science experiment, with wires coming out of the pressure cooker every which way. I thought someone was throwing it out. It had duct tape, and wires going into the cell phone or remote of some sort. But I couldn’t tell because it was all wrapped up in tape. The remote pointed into a white plastic bag.”

She called to report the device, and was standing near it when the NYPD bomb squad arrived. “A man, I guess he was a detective, saw me, and he shouted ‘RUN!” Schreibman tells the Post. She then retired to a friend’s house to play Scrabble, but couldn’t stop worrying about her cat Oceaie, who frequently sits at the window facing the street. Police wouldn’t let her back into her home until 3 a.m., when a detective finally escorted her back to collect the cat. “I can’t believe it was really a bomb,” Schreibman added.

The Boston Marathon Bombers’ Hostage’s Account of His Night Being Carjacked by the Brothers

Dun Meng’s account of him being held hostage before escaping is just simply riveting:

If Dun Meng wasn’t so dang responsible, he would have never fallen into the clutches of the Tsarnaev brothers, four days after they bombed the Boston Marathon finish line.

But if he wasn’t so resourceful, the brothers would have gone on to do worse.

He had had a long day at the office, so he climbed into his Mercedes-Benz ML350 SUV and drove along the Charles River to relax. He had turned left, over the BU Bridge, into Boston, and headed onto Brighton Avenue when a friend texted him.

Rather than do what just about everybody else would do — text while driving — 28-year-old Dun Meng pulled over.

“I’m a transportation engineer, so I feel it’s unsafe,” Dun Meng replied.

Almost as soon as he pulled over, a green sedan stopped right behind him. He thought it was odd how fast it showed up.

A guy got out of the passenger side and approached Dun Meng’s passenger side. Dun Meng figured he wanted directions, so he rolled down the window.

It was Tamerlan Tsarnaev, just minutes after he had assassinated MIT Police Officer Sean Collier. He reached in through the window, opened the door and jumped right in the passenger seat.

“He pointed the gun to me,” Dun Meng said. “Right to my head.”

This link from LiveLeak has the video of his escape and the 911 call made after it.

New Video Of Paris Gunmen During Charlie Hebdo Attack

From Mashable:

Shortly after two gunmen killed 12 people at the offices of French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo, the attackers shouted, “We are avenging the prophet Muhammad!” before firing on a police car and making their escape, according to a new eyewitness video released on Tuesday.

The attackers, brothers Chérif and Saïd Kouachi, are seen in the video adjusting their weapons and driving away in their hijacked black Citröen C3 car in the street outside Charlie Hebdo’s Paris headquarters.

They then encounter a French police car, exchange gunfire for a few brief seconds and drive away. They were shot dead three days later by French commandos in a siege at a printing house.

Charlie Hebdo’s First Cover Since the Attack

From Mic.com:

The first cover of Charlie Hebdo since the deadly Jan. 7 attack that left 12 dead is here, and it’s a doozy.

Liberation reports that the French satirical newspaper’s “survivor issue” cover will feature an image of the Prophet Muhammad holding a “Je Suis Charlie” sign, along with the words “Tout est pardonne,” or “All is forgiven.”

The new issue of Charlie Hebdo hit newsstands on Wednesday, Jan. 14, with an estimated print run of more than 3 million copies, far higher than paper’s normal run of 60,000. It will also be translated into 16 languages.

Three Days That Shook France: How Police Hunted Paris Killers

From Bloomberg:

Fifty-three hours into France’s worst security crisis in a generation, President Francois Hollande and his closest advisers came to an agonizing conclusion.

Gathered to supervise the response to a pair of attacks by Islamist terrorists, they were told by police commanders over secure cell phones that the resolution would have to involve simultaneous assaults. That meant synchronizing special-forces teams 25 miles apart against opponents armed with automatic weapons, a rocket launcher and no qualms about more killing.

At about 4 p.m. on Jan. 9, Hollande was seated at the oval wooden conference table in his Elysee Palace office with Prime Minister Manuel Valls, Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve and Justice Minister Christiane Taubira. A window was open to the garden, taking advantage of unseasonably warm weather. Chief of Staff Jean-Pierre Jouyet shuttled in and out of the room as the Elysee military attache, General Benoit Puga, was advising the president on his decision.

Hollande never gave the order. Events spiraled too fast, as government officials and eyewitnesses later recounted.

By the time the shooting ended just over an hour later, three terrorists were dead, bringing the body count of victims and perpetrators during the three-day crisis to 20.