Earthquake in Chile

From The Big Picture:

At 3:34 am local time, today, February 27th, a devastating magnitude 8.8 earthquake struck Chile, one of the strongest earthquakes ever recorded. According to Chilean authorities, over 400 people are now known to have been killed. The earthquake also triggered a Tsunami which is right now propagating across the Pacific Ocean, due to arrive in Hawaii in hours (around 11:00 am local time). The severity of the Tsunami is still not known, but alerts are being issued across the Pacific.

Welcoming the Year of the Tiger

From The Big Picture:

Last Sunday, February 14th was the first day of the Chinese Lunar New Year. It is also the beginning of the Chinese Spring Festival, with celebrations and observations by ethnic Chinese and others around the world, welcoming in the Year of the Tiger. Conservationists are hoping to capitalize on the Year of the Tiger by calling attention to the plight of the endangered big cats. The number of wild tigers is thought to have dropped from 100,000 at the beginning of the 20th century to fewer than 3,000 today. In September, the World Bank and Russia will hold a summit on tiger conservation in Vladivostok, encouraging countries that are host to wild tigers to reach agreements to further protect and expand their habitat.

100 Days in Glacier National Park

From The Big Picture:

This summer, Glacier Park Magazine editor Chris Peterson undertook a photographic project to take photos of Montana’s Glacier National Park over 100 consecutive days, starting on May 1, 2009, for a traveling photo show in 2010 to commemorate Glacier’s Centennial. He used a mix of film and digital cameras, including an 8 by 10 field camera, a Kodak Pocket Vest camera, circa 1909, and a Speed Graphic, among others. His idea was to use the cameras that would have been used over the course of the Park’s 100 years.

Native American Prints from 1915-1920

From The Denver Post:

In the early 1900s, William Pennington and Lisle Updike spent most days traveling the four corners area of Colorado, Utah, New Mexico and Arizona in a wagon photographing the people and landscapes. The pair of photographers were based in Durango, Colorado where they leased a small space on Main Street and operated a photography studio. They traveled to the mountains and photographed miners and townspeople and visited Native American Reservations and Pueblos making portraits of the people. Their partnership was short-lived and Pennington soon bought out Updike and took sole control of the studio.

These prints were recently uncovered by Denver Post librarians, tucked away in a folder in a file cabinet. The captions were hand written on the back of each print. Along with the prints, a page of the Denver Post newspaper showed that the prints were featured in the January 30, 1974 newspaper.