Category Internet

Explaining Google’s PageRank

From Smashing Magazine:

Everybody is using it, but (almost) nobody really knows, how it works. Google PageRank is probably one of the most important algorithms ever developed for the Web. With billions of existing pages and millions of pages generated every day, the search issue in the Web is more complex than you probably think it is. PageRank, only one of hundreds of factors used by Google to determine best search results, helps to keep our search clean and efficient. But how is it actually done? How does Google PageRank work, which factors do have an impact on it and which don’t? And what do we really know about PageRank?

In this article we put the facts straight.

Interesting Images Found Using Google’s Street View

Laudon Tech is compiling a list of interesting images found using Google’s Street View tool.

Below is a list of interesting sites and places people have found using Google’s new Street View feature. If you have found something interesting using Google Maps Street View, drop me an email and I’ll post it.

Allison Stokke and Internet Fame

The Washington Post has a story on Allison Stokke, a high school pole vaulter, who became an internet celebrity when blogs started posting her picture online en masse.

NORWALK, Calif. — Early this month, 18-year-old Allison Stokke walked into her high school track coach’s office and asked if he knew any reliable media consultants. Stokke had tired of constant phone calls, of relentless Internet attention, of interview requests from Boston to Brazil.

In her high school track and field career, Stokke had won a 2004 California state pole vaulting title, broken five national records and earned a scholarship to the University of California, yet only track devotees had noticed. Then, in early May, she received e-mails from friends who warned that a year-old picture of Stokke idly adjusting her hair at a track meet in New York had been plastered across the Internet. She had more than 1,000 new messages on her MySpace page. A three-minute video of Stokke standing against a wall and analyzing her performance at another meet had been posted on YouTube and viewed 150,000 times.

“I just want to find some way to get this all under control,” Stokke told her coach.

Three weeks later, Stokke has decided that control is essentially beyond her grasp. Instead, she said, she has learned a distressing lesson in the unruly momentum of the Internet. A fan on a Cal football message board posted a picture of the attractive, athletic pole vaulter. A popular sports blogger in New York found the picture and posted it on his site. Dozens of other bloggers picked up the same image and spread it. Within days, hundreds of thousands of Internet users had searched for Stokke’s picture and leered.

Getting Access to Gmail Accounts of the Deceased

This comes from Search Engine Roundtable who got it from this Google Groups thread.

1. Your full name and contact information, including a verifiable email address.
2. The Gmail address of the individual who passed away.
3a. The full header from an email message that you have received at your verifiable email address, from the Gmail account in question. (To obtain the header from a message in Gmail, open the message, click ‘More options,’ then click ‘Show original.’ Copy everything from ‘Delivered- To:’ through the ‘References:’ line. To obtain headers from other webmail or email providers, please refer to http://www.spamcop.com/help_with_headers/)
3b. The entire contents of the message.
4. A copy of the death certificate of the deceased.
5. A copy of the document that gives you Power of Attorney over the Gmail account.
6. If you are the parent of the individual, please send us a copy of the Birth Certificate if the Gmail account owner was under the age of 18. In this case, Power of Attorney is not required.

12 Important U.S. Laws Every Blogger Needs to Know

Helpful.

While the Internet still retains some of the “wild wild west” feel, increasingly Internet activity, and particular blogging, is being shaped and governed by state and federal laws. For US bloggers in particular, blogging has become a veritable land mine of potential legal issues, and the situation isn’t helped by the fact that the law in this area is constantly in flux. In this article we highlight twelve of the most important US laws when it comes to blogging and provide some simple and straightforward tips for safely navigating them.

(via Digg)

The 13 Most Embarrassing Web Moments

From PCWorld. Huffy up there just made #13.

Google Buys Garage Where Empire Began

From Newsvine:

SAN FRANCISCO — Internet search leader Google Inc. has added a landmark to its rapidly expanding empire — the Silicon Valley home where co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin rented a garage eight years ago as they set out to change the world.

The Mountain View-based company bought the 1,900-square-foot home in nearby Menlo Park from one of its own employees, Susan Wojcicki, who had agreed to lease her garage for $1,700 per month because she wanted some help paying the mortgage.

Wojcicki, now Google’s vice president of product management, didn’t work for the company at the time and only knew the Stanford University graduate students because one of her friends had dated Brin.

During Google’s five-month history there, the garage became like a second home for Page and Brin.

Accept Jesus, Forever Forgiven

I dare you to look at this site for more than five seconds without having your retinas bleed.

Something Awful’s AOL Search Log Special

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Something Awful users find some of the more, er, interesting search queries from AOL’s released logs.

(via del.icio.us/plutor)

Search Engine for Released AOL Logs

You can search through the AOL logs by anon id or by search query using this search engine. Waxy is calling the searches of user 711391 an unbelievable epic and I have to agree. (Enter in 71139 into the search by Anonid field to check it out for yourself.)


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