Lord of the Rings’ Mines of Moria Entrance for Home Theater

Nerdgasm:

The door was painted over with regular house paint (see the youtube video for initial results) i didn’t like how distorted and dim it made the artwork. I ended up scraping the design out, and repainted it. I got a much better result. I even enjoy the small imperfections from the scraping, makes it look more rustic like it belongs on the face of a rock door.

Right now the door opens automatically after a touch of the hand. soon I will integrate voice recognition, so you will first have to touch it to illuminate it, then speak the elvish word for friend “Mellon” in order to gain access. I’m also going to cause the light just above this door to flicker and go out right before the door illuminates to have a much larger BAAM! effect.

For those interested in the electronic application of it. I use an Arduino Uno board, the touch sensing is done using capacitive touch, and the voice recognition will be completed using a VR shield 2.0. the door opens automatically using a normal automatic door opener (I purchased on from Olide and am very happy with it).

The D&D Room

From The Acaeum:

I have been working on and off for about 2 years building our “D&D ROOM” to hold most of our collection and give us a cool place to play. I did 99.9% of the work myself with just a bit of help in the attic from my brother Shawn. All lighting is controlled by the DM via a dimmer/control box mounted under the table. When you walk in the lights automatically come on via a contactor mounted in the closet. There is also hidden strobe and fog machine for effects. I also mounted speakers in the beams and have a sound system in the closet. Here are a few photos…

(via Boing Boing)

The Most Epic FAILs in Star Wars Design

John Scalzi:

R2-D2
Sure, he’s cute, but the flaws in his design are obvious the first time he approaches anything but the shallowest of stairs. Also: He has jets, a periscope, a taser and oil canisters to make enforcer droids fall about in slapsticky fashion — and no voice synthesizer. Imagine that design conversation: “Yes, we can afford slapstick oil and tasers, but we’ll never get a 30-cent voice chip past accounting. That’s just madness.”

C-3PO
Can’t fully extend his arms; has a bunch of exposed wiring in his abs; walks and runs as if he has the droid equivalent of arthritis. And you say, well, he was put together by an eight-year-old. Yes, but a trip to the nearest Radio Shack would fix that. Also, I’m still waiting to hear the rationale for making a protocol droid a shrieking coward, aside from George Lucas rummaging through a box of offensive stereotypes (which he’d later return to while building Jar-Jar Binks) and picking out the “mincing gay man” module.