You Should Flip Your Next Pot Pie Upside-Down

I need to try this immediately. Maybe I’ll wait until lunch.

Let’s dissect this approach. There are two problems with personal-sized pies. First, most frozen savory pot pies are circular, and sit on an aluminum shell. It can be annoying to cut the pie with your fork while it’s still in nested the aluminum: Instead of slicing it, you end up scooping it with your fork, creating an uneven ratio of crust to filling. Sometimes, the crust gets mushed into the filling instead of providing its sandwich-like protection.

This unfair filling-to-crust ratio leads to the second problem: the bite’s texture. When the filling overpowers the crust, it’s overly wet. If you’re getting just the crust on the bottom, it can be quite dry. The perfect bite happens when the creamy, savory filling is sandwiched between top and bottom crust.

Flipping the pie upside down solves all those problems. Once it’s out of the aluminum shell, the pie’s bottom crust becomes the top crust, making a flan-like shape. (Yes, you might need a plate instead of eating it right out of the aluminum pan, but have some respect for yourself, even if you’re having a frozen pot pie. You deserve it.)

People Are Pulling Their Pineapple Now (Not a Euphemism!

I guess this is a thing now. Everyone with access to a pineapple and a Twitter account are getting into it with mixed results.

From Eater.com:

Lifehacker’s Claire Lower attempted the pineapple pull last week, and did not have much luck at first. But the intrepid food-hacker writes: “I decided to try my pineapple again, and managed — after gently prodding with my thumb in several spots before really digging in —to get a small chunk.” Lower also notes that it’s “a messy way to eat this juicy fruit” that’s also “not great for sharing.” Some other food hackers suggest that the pineapple needs to be super ripe for the trick to work and it helps to bang it on a hard surface before slicing. According to the pineapple-pulling experts out there, a small Japanese “snack pine” is also apparently the best fruit for this maneuver, since its flesh is super soft.

Like many viral food tricks that are shared on social media — cheese stretching, piñata cake slicing, etc. — pineapple pulling is performative, a little silly, and a lot harder than it looks.

Dorcas Reilly, inventor of the green bean casserole, a Thanksgiving favorite, has died at 92

You know, I just realized I have never had green bean casserole:

In 1955, the AP, like other newspapers and magazines of the time, was running a feature of an easy-to-make Campbell’s Soup side. The question came with a caveat: the recipe had to be built around green beans and Campbell’s Cream of Mushroom Soup, two items most Americans regularly had in their homes in the ’50s.

The request fell to the Campbell’s Soup Co. test kitchen in Camden, N.J., an arm of the company that focused on coming up with recipes for its products. Dorcas Reilly, a supervisor for Campbell’s home economics department, was tasked with leading her team to figure out what could be done. The group would test and grade recipes repeatedly. Only a perfect score would qualify it as ready to go. In November of that year, Reilly and her team settled on what would be first known as “the Green Bean Bake,” an easily adaptable six-ingredient recipe of green beans, cream of mushroom soup, milk, soy sauce, black pepper and French fried onions that takes 10 minutes to prep and 30 minutes to bake.

A Cookbook Written by Concentration Camp Prisoners

From SBS TV:

At the Sydney Jewish Museum, in Darlinghurst, there is a handmade cookbook that is testament to how memories of beloved family dishes can sustain the spirit, if not the body. Located among other Holocaust artefacts in the concentration camps section of the museum, the slim book is no more than 15 cm x 10 cm; you could almost pass it over.

The cookbook was made in 1945 by Hungarian-Jew Edith Peer (nee Gombos) when she was an inmate at Ravensbrück concentration camp for women, located in northern Germany. The cookbook is the only object of its kind in Australia and one of six known ‘fantasy cookbooks’ written by Holocaust concentration camp prisoners in the world. In 2015, it featured in a French documentary film, Imaginary Feasts.

Barely an adult and not knowing how to scramble an egg, Peer would sit with the other women during rare moments of spare time and listen to them “eat with words” as they shared their favourite recipes. It occurred to Edith to learn to cook from these women and collect their recipes because she had every intention of surviving.