Revealing the Contents of a 100-year-old Time Capsule

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From Twisted Sifter:

On April 22, 2013, the Oklahoma Historical Society in partnership with the First Lutheran Church unearthed a 6-ft x 3-ft x 3-ft (1.83m x 0.91m x 0.91m) chest, buried in the church’s basement exactly 100 years prior.

Dubbed the ‘Century Chest‘, the project was created in 1913 by Virginia Sohlberg of the Ladies Aid Society as a fundraiser to help the church purchase a new pipe organ which is still in use today! Space inside the chest was auctioned off to the public to raise money.

The Century Chest’s artifacts were impeccably preserved in airtight, waterproof containers. The chest itself was buried under a 12-inch (30.5 cm) slab of concrete. Removing the chest took over 11 hours and involved removing two 600-pound chunks of concrete and using an engine hoist to get the chest out of its ‘tomb’.

The contents of the chest were unveiled at a live event and Downtown OKC, Inc., a not-for-profit organization, documented the entire experience and posted the photos to an 81-picture gallery on Facebook.

Gary Dahl, Inventor of the Pet Rock, Dies at 78

From the NY Times:

It was a craze to rival the Hula-Hoop, and even less explicable. For a mere three dollars and 95 cents, a consumer could buy … a rock — a plain, ordinary, egg-shaped rock of the kind one could dig up in almost any backyard.

The wonder of it was, for a few frenzied months in 1975, more than a million consumers did, becoming the proud if slightly abashed owners of Pet Rocks, the fad that Newsweek later called “one of the most ridiculously successful marketing schemes ever.”

Gary Dahl, the man behind that scheme — described variously as a marketing genius and a genial mountebank — died on March 23 at 78. A down-at-the-heels advertising copywriter when he hit on the idea, he originally meant it as a joke. But the concept of a “pet” that required no actual work and no real commitment resonated with the self-indulgent ’70s, and before long a cultural phenomenon was born.

The Moses Brown School Announces Classes are Cancelled Due to the Blizzard

Some background from WBUR:

“Sunday morning we saw the weather report,” Adam Olenn explains, “and we said, ‘Oh, we’ve got to get this done.’ ”

So today, Moses Brown School in Providence posted a “School Is Closed” video to YouTube that’s already attracting national attention.

Educational institutions across the region have announced that they’ll be closing for the predicted blizzard via robocalls. Moses Brown spread the word that they’d have a snow day tomorrow with a parody of the “Let It Go” song from Disney’s 2013 animated feature film “Frozen.”

“The snow glows white on Route 95, not a tire track to be seen,” Head of School Matt Glendinning, outfitted in a striped knit hat and sweater, seems to sing at the beginning. “We could make you come to school, but that would just be mean.”

As Olenn, Moses Brown’s director of communications and community engagement, told me the story behind the video tonight, Time magazine retweeted the video and Good Morning America reached out for an interview. “It’s very exciting,” says Olenn, who takes credit for masterminding the video. “On the one hand, it’s surprising. On the other hand, I hoped it would happen.”

Top Tongue Twisters in French

From Flashsticks:

Si mon tonton tond ton tonton, ton tonton sera tondu.
If my uncle shaves your uncle, your uncle will be shaved.

Si six scies scient six cyprès, six cents scies scient six cent cyprès.
If six saws saw six cypresses, six hundred saws saw six hundred cypresses.

Lily lit le livre dans le lit.
Lily reads the book in the bed.

The rise of Starbucks reveals how we really live, and it ain’t pretty.

From In These Times:

Simon shows us how we really live, and it ain’t pretty. There was a time, not so long ago, Simon reminds us, that many of us wondered why people would pay so much money for a cup of coffee—even as we were edging closer in line to place our own order. Starbucks, writes Simon, “had little to do with coffee, and everything to do with style, status, identity and aspiration. … Starbucks delivered more than a stiff shot of caffeine. It pinpointed, packaged, and made easily available, if only through smoke and mirrors, the things that the broad American middle class wanted and thought it needed to make its public and private lives better.” Starbucks fed our emotional needs for status. It became our little “self-gift,” an emotional pick-me-up. It allowed us to feel successful.

(via Monochrome)