Press Release of the Day

Nothing says class like turning a tragedy into a marketing opportunity:

Could a bedside shotgun rack have saved jennifer hudson’s family from tragic death?

Chicago, IL (MMD Newswire) October 28, 2008 — Tragedy strikes in a Chicago home leaving 3 people dead and an Oscar winner forced to identify the bodies of her family.

Jennifer Hudson’s mother and brother were gunned down in their home Friday. Could an invaluable device have saved their lives? It’s called The BackUp and it is a bedside shotgun rack.

Everyday, there are over 8,000 home invasions in America, many resulting in assault, rape, and murder. That’s according to a report by the US Department of Justice.

Whether it is someone known or a stranger entering the home, too many people in this country are paying with their lives during these home invasions. The Hudson family is just one of far too many Americans gunned down in their own home.

(via Slog)

Microsoft anti-Mac work was made on Mac

From AdWeek:

Just as Microsoft and Crispin Porter + Bogusky tried to play down the wreck of the HMS Conquistador by quickly launching their new “I’m a PC” spots, another PR snafu has swept the blogosphere. Looking at data embedded in Microsoft’s online photos from the campaign, a savvy Flickr user found that the images were created using Adobe software on a Macintosh (versus, say, Microsoft Expression Studio on a PC).

Sao Paulo: City Without Ads



From DesignVerb.com:

What happens when a mayor decides to ban advertisements in a vibrant city of 11 million people with more than 8,000 billboards? Impossible, insane, absurd, or just plain genius? Well this is what happened this past January when mayor Gilberto Kassabs “Clean City” law was introduced in Sao Paulo Brazil banning any form of advertising throughout the city to rid of “visual clutter”. (reminds me of the “advertising is graffiti” stunt, or my dislike for posters in Milan)

(via Ektopia)

Hundreds Click on ‘Click Here to Get Infected’ Ad

From eWeek.com:

People will click on anything.

That was evidenced by the 409 people who clicked on an ad that offers infection for those with virus-free PCs. The ad, run by a person who identifies himself as security professional Didier Stevens,…

…Stevens, who says he works for Contraste Europe, a branch of the IT consultancy The Contraste Group, has been running his Google Adwords campaign for six months now and has received 409 hits. Stevens has done similar research in the past, such as finding out how easy it is to land on a drive-by download site when doing a Google search.

In a posting about the drive-by download campaign, Stevens says that he got the idea after picking up a small book on Google Adwords at the library and finding out how easy and cheap it is to set up an ad.

“You can start with a couple of euros per month,” he said. “And that gave me an idea: this can be used with malicious [intent]. It’s a way to get a drive-by download site on the first page of a search.”