David Chase on The Sopranos’ Final Scene

He can try to justify it any way he wants. I still think it was one of the most disappointing endings since Seinfeld:

Was Tony Soprano’s quiet meal with his family in a local ice cream parlor his last supper? Whether or not he was whacked gangland style in the “Made in America” finale of The Sopranos is not a question that concerns David Chase, creator of the series and director of the last episode. Chase is far more interested in larger philosophical issues about the choices we make in life that lead us to that point, and enjoying the good times, fleeting though they may be.

After orchestrating the murder of a rival gang boss and dodging a bullet yet again, Tony (James Gandolfini) is breathing, if not easier, with at least a sense of relief as he meets his wife Carmela (Edie Falco) and kids (Jamie-Lynn Sigler and Robert Iler) at Holsten’s for “the best onion rings in the state” and flips through the jukebox. It’s almost a Norman Rockwell scene with a group of Cub Scouts, young lovers, football hero murals, and locals enjoying the warm and homey atmosphere. Chase says time itself is the raw material of the scene as the suspense builds with pinpoint editing while Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin'” propels the action to its climax—a heart-stopping cut to black.

Chase was after the dreamy, chilling feeling he admired at the end of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey in which time expands and contracts as life and death merge into one. And there, as in the concluding instant of The Sopranos, who knows what really happens. “When it’s over,” Chase offers, “I think you’re probably always blindsided by it. That’s all I can say.”

The final scene is here if you feel like being frustrated all over again. (It won’t let me embed)

(via Metafilter where the debate rages on if Tony is killed or not at the end)

Jorge Ramos Corners Rubio: Would You Attend a Gay Wedding?

One day after he confirmed to CNN’s Jake Tapper that he believes marriage should be between one man and one woman, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) went on Jorge Ramos’ Fusion show where the host confronted him on the issue using a new angle.

“If someone in your family or your office that happens to be gay and they invite you to their wedding, would you go?” Ramos asked the senator.

“If there’s somebody that I love that’s in my life, I don’t necessarily have to agree with their decisions or the decisions they’ve made to continue to love them and participate in important events,” Rubio said. He compared it to attending “second marriages,” which are not strictly allowed the Catholic faith.

“If it’s somebody in my life that I care for, of course I would,” Rubio reiterated on the question of attending gay weddings. “I’m not going to hurt them simply because I disagree with a choice they’ve made or because I disagree with a decision they’ve made, or whatever it may be.”

Christian Car Shop Owner in MI Will Deny Service to Gay Customers

The facebook post is here:

Enough is enough.

Our rights as conservative Americans are being squashed more and more everyday. Apparently if you are white (or close to it), you have a job, go to church, and own a gun… That translates into racists, privileged, bigot, conspiracy theorist. Too many of us say nothing. Well, freedom of speech isn’t just for Liberals, THEY are the ones that need to learn to “co-exist”, THEY are the ones who need to WORK to be “equal”

Therefore, in the spirit of freedom (whats left of it) and MY right to operate MY business as I see fit:

Guns ARE allowed at DIESELTEC, so much so in fact that we will offer a discount if you bring in your gun. (“On duty” cops are excluded because thats not their gun, thats my gun bought with my money, off duty absolutely!)

I am a Christian. My company will be run in a way that reflects that. Dishonesty, thievery, immoral behavior, etc. will not be welcomed at MY place of business. (I would not hesitate to refuse service to an openly gay person or persons. Homosexuality is wrong, period. If you want to argue this fact with me then I will put your vehicle together with all bolts and no nuts and you can see how that works.)

We, as a team, work hard for whats ours. We are not protected by unions or contracts. We absolutely MUST provide our customers with a service level that would make them come back or tell their friends about us. We don’t have a “right”, and we are not “entitled” to our pay. We must EARN it.

I am not racists, you are for assuming I am, however, I am really quick to judge… if it acts like a duck, and quacks like a duck…

It IS a free country and I support your right to your opinion, that being said, if you don’t like what I have to say I reserve that same right to tell you to go cry to your momma (cause your daddy would probably smack ya’, better yet, yes, go tell your dad.)

(via Joe My God)

Comedian Ricky Gervais sets off shitstorm by tweeting photo of hunter and giraffe she killed

From Raw Story:

A big game hunter from Utah is the focus of a wave of Internet outrage after comedian Ricky Gervais tweeted a photo of her lying next to a freshly-killed giraffe.

The New York Daily News reported that Rebecca Francis has been receiving death threats after the photo went viral.

Francis is a mother of 8 who has a website and Facebook page dedicated to posting photos of the exotic animals she has paid to kill with a bow and arrow.

Let’s get the obvious stuff out of the way first. Anybody tweeting death threats to her is an asshole and law enforcement should look into it. Secondly, although I don’t hunt, nor do I have any desire to, I do eat meat and don’t begrudge anybody the right to hunt if they are using it for food. But these big game hunters are just creepy. I’m not sure if it’s because of the trophy photos that they take with a joyous murderous gleam in their eye as they stand over the carcass or their shitty justification of her hunt:

We just connected with Rebecca Francis and got a statement on her Giraffe hunt that anti-hunters are attacking her for. Rebecca said, “When I was in Africa five years ago I was of the mindset that I would never shoot a giraffe. I was approached toward the end of my hunt with a unique circumstance. They showed me this beautiful old bull giraffe that was wandering all alone. He had been kicked out of the herd by a younger and stronger bull. He was past his breeding years and very close to death. They asked me if I would preserve this giraffe by providing all the locals with food and other means of survival. He was inevitably going to die soon and he could either be wasted or utilized by the local people. I chose to honor his life by providing others with his uses and I do not regret it for one second. Once he was down there were people waiting to take his meat.

So she was doing a service to the animal and to the poor starving African villagers who need the great white american huntress to help feed them.