Did You Just Get Accepted to Carnegie Mellon? Not So Fast

Oops:

Ben Leibowitz called up relatives to tell them he got into Carnegie Mellon University’s prestigious graduate computer science program. He even went out to dinner with his parents to celebrate.

Then he got a second email saying he hadn’t been accepted after all.

About 800 other Carnegie Mellon applicants experienced similar swings of ecstasy and agony Monday – first rejoicing that the Pittsburgh institution had selected them for its master of science in computer science, then being told the acceptances were sent in error and that they had been rejected.

“It was brutal. I didn’t get much sleep last night,” Leibowitz, of Stamford, Connecticut, said Tuesday. “Now I have to clean up the mess. I’m calling all my relatives, I’m going, ‘I’m sorry it’s not happening.'”

Carnegie Mellon spokesman Kenneth Walters said the “Welcome to Carnegie Mellon!” messages were the result of “serious mistakes” in the university’s process for generating acceptance letters and that it would conduct a review to prevent another error.

Possible Anne Boleyn portrait found using facial recognition software

From The Guardian:

Pictures of the beguiling queen – who is played by a steely Claire Foy in the hit BBC historical drama Wolf Hall – were roundly destroyed after her death in 1536. The concerted effort to erase her from history was thorough, leaving only a battered lead disc as a contemporary likeness, the Moost Happi medal in the British Museum in London.

But another portrait from the late 16th century has emerged as a likely painting of the queen. Researchers in California used state-of-the-art face recognition to compare the face on the Moost Happi medal with a number of paintings and found a close match with the privately owned Nidd Hall portrait, held at the Bradford Art Galleries and Museums.

The Nidd Hall artwork shows a woman wearing jewellery long thought to be Boleyn’s. But scholars have been divided on the figure’s identity. Some claim the woman is Boleyn’s successor, Jane Seymour, the third wife of King Henry VIII.