Fox Host: How Do We Spot ‘Bad Guys’ If We Don’t Know ‘Tone Of Their Skin’?

Oh ferfucksake:

Fox News anchor Shannon Bream on Wednesday pondered how observers would’ve known that the gunmen who perpetuated the terrorist attack on French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo were bad guys if they didn’t know what their skin color was.

Bream’s comments were made during an in-depth conversation on the Fox show “Outnumbered” about why the terrorist attacks in France provided support for the militarization of police in the United States.

Co-host Eric Bolling said militarized police would dissuade “bad” guys from doing the “bad thing” they were thinking about doing.

Co-host Kennedy Montgomery, who goes by just the name “Kennedy,” noted that “sometimes bad guys don’t look like bad guys.”

That’s when Bream joined in.

“That’s my question about these guys because if we know they were speaking unaccented French and they had, you know, ski masks on, do we even know what color they were,” Bream said. “What the tone of their skin was. I mean what if they didn’t look like typical bad guys?’

The Wicked Bible

From Wikipedia:

The Wicked Bible, sometimes called Adulterous Bible or Sinners’ Bible, is a term referring to the Bible published in 1631 by Robert Barker and Martin Lucas, the royal printers in London, which was meant to be a reprint of the King James Bible. The name is derived from a mistake made by the compositors: in the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:14), the word not in the sentence “Thou shalt not commit adultery” was omitted, thus changing the sentence into “Thou shalt commit adultery”. This blunder was spread in a number of copies. About a year later, the publishers of the Wicked Bible were called to the Star Chamber and fined £300 (£43,586 as of 2015)[1] and deprived of their printing license.[2] The fact that this edition of the Bible contained such a flagrant mistake outraged Charles I and George Abbot, the Archbishop of Canterbury, who said then:

I knew the time when great care was had about printing, the Bibles especially, good compositors and the best correctors were gotten being grave and learned men, the paper and the letter rare, and faire every way of the best, but now the paper is nought, the composers boys, and the correctors unlearned.[3]