The Transformation of Toronto’s Skyline From 1880 to Today


From blogTO:

There’s few more obvious ways to track the growth of a city than by charting the transformation of its skyline. Perhaps this is especially the case with a city like Toronto, where developments have seemed to come in major stages, whether this be the rise of the Royal York Hotel in the late 1920s, the Toronto Dominion Centre in the late 60s or, of course, the addition of the CN Tower in the mid-70s. And even if such documentation fails to tell an in-depth story about the nature of the city, it remains intriguing to examine the process by which Toronto grew up on a macro level.

The photos below speak mostly for themselves in this capacity, but a few provisos are worthy of mention. In a perfect world, an exercise like this one would compare depictions of the skyline from the same vantage point so as to give the most accurate representation of its growth. Unfortunately, however, this is not strictly the case with the images below. While an attempt has been made to be consistent, there is quite a bit of variance from one angle to another.

Glenn Beck’s rally was large, vague, moist, and undirected—the Waterworld of white self-pity.

Hitchens:

In a rather curious and confused way, some white people are starting almost to think like a minority, even like a persecuted one. What does it take to believe that Christianity is an endangered religion in America or that the name of Jesus is insufficiently spoken or appreciated? Who wakes up believing that there is no appreciation for our veterans and our armed forces and that without a noisy speech from Sarah Palin, their sacrifice would be scorned? It’s not unfair to say that such grievances are purely and simply imaginary, which in turn leads one to ask what the real ones can be. The clue, surely, is furnished by the remainder of the speeches, which deny racial feeling so monotonously and vehemently as to draw attention.

I Don’t Know Who To Hate On This One

An AZ cop went to a KFC to get some chicken. They were out of the chicken he wanted and refused to give him his money back but instead insisted on giving him a voucher and another type of chicken. The cop then decides to start arresting everyone:

A high-ranking Williams police officer has lost his job after a dispute over a meal.

Accounts of what happened vary, with two restaurant employees saying the off-duty officer threatened to arrest them over some chicken, and the officer saying he did not.

The Williams police chief, Herman Nixon, said the officer was fired for using his position and authority for personal gain, by attempting to get a refund on the meal.

“Right after it happened, I stripped him of his police powers,” Nixon said.

Williams Police Lt. Michael Graham, who formerly ranked second-in-command in the department, said he plans to file a wrongful-termination lawsuit over his July 28 firing, and that his restaurant complaint is a real case of fraud that the police ignored.

“He ordered some chicken that we didn’t have available at that moment,” during a July visit, said Tavi Padilla, the restaurant manager on duty at the time at a Williams KFC/Taco Bell.

Another manager offered another type of chicken and a voucher for a free meal later during the July 9 visit. But Graham wanted his money back, which is against store policy, according to Padilla.

“He told me, ‘Look, fat a–, I don’t want to talk. Just give me my money or I’m taking you to jail. Do you know who I am?’” Padilla told other Williams police officers via a written statement.

Padilla took off his apron, ready to go to jail, he said.

Corey Fritsinger, 19, is another manager at the store and the owner’s son.

“He told me that he was the police lieutenant and told me I had to give him his money back. I said that whether he’s the president of the United States or just a regular person, I can’t give him his money back,” Fritsinger said.

Fritsinger later left the counter to phone his father.

“He asked me how old I was and said he was going to take me to jail personally,” he said. “He said, ‘I’m putting you in the back of my car.’”

The Williams Police Department promptly responded to a public records request from the Arizona Daily Sun by providing documents on the case.

Statements from Graham’s call to police dispatch that day record Graham as saying to a dispatcher: “I’ve got a problem with the manager. I’m going to take him for fraudulent activity, so I need a car.”

Another Williams police officer said Graham asked to use the other officer’s handcuffs to make the arrest, according to reports, and Graham offered to write up the related arrest paperwork.

Graham was on leave from the department at the time, following a serious April motorcycle accident in which he received multiple injuries, including a brain injury.

His memory of the events is different.

“The thing that I’m proud of: I didn’t lose my temper. I didn’t raise my voice. This isn’t worth it,” Graham said, especially in light of the brain injury sustained in the motorcycle accident.

I’m not sure who to hate in this story. Should I hate the overreaction of a cop who starts using his badge to bully some fast food workers or should I hate the ridiculous policy that this franchise has refusing to refund money when they’re out of the product you paid for? Is it too much to ask for Palin to get involved so I can direct my anger constructively?