Arizona Immigration Lawsuits: Tucson, Flagstaff City Councils Vote To Sue

From the HuffPost:

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — The Tucson and Flagstaff city councils voted Tuesday to sue Arizona over its tough new immigration law, citing concerns about enforcement costs and negative effects on the state’s tourism industry.

They are the first municipalities in Arizona to approve legal challenges to the law. Earlier this week, proposed litigation in Phoenix took a hit when the city attorney said Mayor Phil Gordon lacks the authority to file suit without the support of the City Council.

The new state law requires local and state law enforcement officers to question people about their immigration status if there is reason to suspect they’re in the country illegally.

Suns to wear ‘Los Suns’ uniforms to honor Phoenix’s Latino community

From one of those sporting blogs:

In general, people in the sports world keep their political leanings to themselves. Sure, there are a few guys who regularly speak out on political issues, but for the most part that’s considered bad business. As Michael Jordan put it, “Republicans buy shoes too.” That’s why what the Phoenix Suns are doing is so amazing.

The team will be wearing its “Los Suns” jerseys for Wednesday night’s Game 2 against the San Antonio Spurs “to honor [the] Latino community and the diversity of our league, the state of Arizona, and our nation.” Awesome.

The decision to wear the jerseys came from way up the corporate ladder, as team owner Robert Sarver suggested the team wear their Noche Latina alternates.

High-Fructose Corn Syrup: Dietary Scourge or Unfairly Maligned Sweetener?

From Epicurious:

When I went back and reread some of Pollan’s and Schlosser’s work, I discovered that they never actually said that replacing high-fructose corn syrup with sugar (as Hunt’s brand ketchup recently did in response to consumer demand) would solve the obesity problem. The problem with HFCS is more about the ubiquity of highly sweetened products as a whole. The corn crop is subsidized by the U.S. government, making HFCS much cheaper than sugar. This makes it easy for companies to produce extremely cheap, extremely unhealthy junk food, which then becomes the cheapest and easiest source of calories for people on a budget. This is why, in many underprivileged neighborhoods, you’ll find a glut of fast-food restaurants and bodegas selling processed snacks, but a dearth of (more expensive) fresh produce.