24 Secret Restaurant Menus Revealed

Hmmmmm:

Mention “secret menus” and many people think of hidden functions on Blackberries or Xbox games. Actually, secret menus refers to items you can special order at restaurants that aren’t mentioned on standard menus.

Some places, like Chipotle Mexican Grills, have a whole secret menu that’s limited only by your imagination. On the other hand, In-N-Out Burger’s secret menu” is so unsecret it’s posted on their Web site. Kind of takes the cool factor out of having the inside scoop, doesn’t it?

If you’re looking to impress a date or just like that feeling of “knowing the chef,” here are 24 restaurants that offer secret menus. Remember, not all may participate in the hidden menu. However, if you try to order something and the server looks at you with a blank look, don’t give up. Describe the dish and usually they’ll make it for you anyway.

Pope’s sainthood setback after ‘miracle cure’ nun reported to be ill again

From The Guardian:

It was the miracle that set Pope John Paul II on the road to sainthood and provided faithful followers with proof of his holy powers. But hopes that the former pope’s canonisation would be fast-tracked by Sister Marie Simon-Pierre’s recovery from Parkinson’s disease have been set back by reports that the French nun has fallen ill again.

Simon-Pierre described three years ago how she regained her health after a night of prayer to the then recently deceased Polish pontiff. John Paul also suffered from Parkinson’s disease, which is incurable.

“It’s like a second birth,” she said at the time. “I feel like I’ve discovered a new body, new limbs.”

In 2007 Simon-Pierre could barely move her left side, could not write legibly, drive or move around easily and was in constant pain.

Her disease worsened after the pope’s death, and her order prayed for his intervention to ease her suffering. Then after writing his name on a paper one night, she woke up the next day apparently cured and returned to work as a maternity nurse with no traces of the disease.

But according to the Polish daily newspaper Rzeczpospolita, one of the doctors charged with scrutinising the nun’s case believed she might have been suffering from a similar nervous disease, not Parkinson’s, which could go into sudden remission. A report on the paper’s website went further, saying that the 49-year-old nun had become sick again with the same illness.