Valley Station Church to Hold Gun Service

From The Courier Journal:

A Valley Station Road church is sponsoring an “Open Carry Church Service” in late June, encouraging people to wear unloaded guns in their holsters, enter a raffle to win a free handgun, hear patriotic music and listen to talks by operators of gun stores and firing ranges.
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Pastor Ken Pagano of New Bethel Church said the first-time event is “basically trying to think a little bit outside the box” to promote “responsible gun ownership and 2nd Amendment rights.”

The event, slated for late Saturday afternoon, June 27, is being promoted with online posters, including one using a red font resembling splattered blood with the words: “Open Carry Church Service.”

Pagano said the poster wasn’t intended to glorify bloodshed and that the lettering was just “a font that somebody developed.” And he said he didn’t want the event to be confused with regular Sunday worship at the Assemblies of God congregation.

“It’s just a celebration we’re doing to coincide with Fourth of July,” he said. “There are people who own firearms and do so responsibly and enjoy them as a sport, maybe like golfing or bowling.”


Here’s the church website
promoting the pray-n-shoot.

(via J-Walk)

Chandlerisms

A collection of similes and one-liners from Raymond Chandler novels. (I’m currently reading Farewell, My Lovely)

“I belonged in Idle Valley like a pearl onion on a banana split.”–The Long Good-bye (Chapter 13)

“Even on Central Avenue, not the quietest dressed street in the world, he looked about as inconspicuous as a tarantula on a slice of angel food.”–Farewell, My Lovely (Chapter 1)

“From thirty feet away she looked like a lot of class. From ten feet away she looked like something made up to be seen from thirty feet away.”–The High Window (Chapter 5)

The Compassion of Dr. Tiller

From The American Prospect:

The Web site A Heartbreaking Choice is a place where women share their stories of late-term abortion. Though clearly pro-choice, the point of the site is not political; it is a support group for grieving parents. These are women who desperately wanted their babies but whose pregnancies turned disastrous. A section of the site is devoted to “Kansas Stories,” because when women learn very late in their pregnancies that their fetuses have abnormalities that are likely to be fatal, Dr. George Tiller’s Wichita clinic, Women’s Health Care Services, was one of the only places in the country that could help them.

One woman described her elation at being pregnant and how the possibility of motherhood offered a glimmer of hope through several family deaths. Then she found out her fetus had severe spinal and cerebral deformities. “I laid on the table crying and knowing in my heart at that point my son was not going to make it,” she wrote. At almost 23 weeks pregnant, she was too far along for an abortion in her own state, and so, like many women in her situation, she made the anguished pilgrimage to Wichita.

Writing five weeks after her abortion, she said, “I hate that my son is gone. I hate that I had to make the decision to end his life. I hate that my womb and my arms are empty. But I am strengthened in the fact that I made my decision by focusing on him and what was best for him. I am eternally grateful to the wonderful people that guided me through this horrible experience with compassion, love, and understanding.”

Her gratitude toward Tiller and his staff is not unique. Ayliea Holl, the administrator of the site, saw a different doctor for her own abortion, but she’s met many of Tiller’s patients. “Every single one of them received the kindest, most caring and compassionate, the best health care that they could get,” she says. “Dr. Tiller was extremely compassionate. He was so helpful to so many women.”