Richard Nixon Analyzing ‘All in the Family’

(via Classic TV Showbiz)

Comments

8 Comments so far. Leave a comment below.
  1. Mike K,

    This was a conservative that was offended by All in the Family because it “glorified” (accepted) minorities and gays. The irony is that the show could NEVER air as a main stream (prime time) show today because it would be considered too offensive, but not to conservatives. Now the ones being offended and protesting would be the gays and minority groups that Archie criticizes.

    We’ve come full circle. Today Archie would be the outsider with oddball points of view and beliefs.

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  2. I well recall the first airing of the episode they were talking about. I thought it was pretty neat. My parents enjoyed it, too, although they were probably wondering if I needed an explanation at my tender age (I didn’t).

    No, Archie would not be the outsider in my community today. There are plenty Archie Bunkers still around.

    You know, it never occurred to me that the Nixon tapes would have any everyday conversations in them. Since I was young when that happened, I guess I always figured it was incriminating political schemes and war talk.

    The very last line is a real kicker!

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  3. Mike K,

    No, Archie would not be the outsider in my community today. There are plenty Archie Bunkers still around.

    I do agree. I didn’t mean he’s a rarity in reality – there are definitely plenty of Archies still around (my Dad was exactly like that until the day he died). I meant that the character of Archie on a TV show would have to be portrayed as uncommon and clearly a bad guy with a chip on his shoulder. Today’s viewing audience wouldn’t accept his prejudice as part of his “charm” and the source of punchlines the way it was back then.

    Most of the lines that got laughs beck then would be dramatic moments now.

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  4. Nick E. P.,

    I’m saving this one as a favorite. Please post more Nixon tapes!

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  5. Justin,

    First of all, how closeted was Nixon? Virile this and virile that.

    Secondly, hot pants!

    Lastly, this guy ran the freaking country. I think that long before Obama, Nixon proved that truly anyone could become president.

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  6. jimbo,

    Your heard the man, more Nixon tapes!

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  7. What was up with the 14 second beep?

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  8. Phil franks,

    several errors are made in the transcript. It was written up by the youtube poster and is not an official transcript. Not the least of which is the part where Richard Nixon is thought to have said “I do not mind the homosexuality, I understand . . (it)? . . then the bleep. If you listen carefully you will NOT hear him say the word “it”. In other words, he did not say he understood homosexuality. I even slowed the sound down to be certain.
    Omissions in the tapes were made for a variety of reasons and one such reason was (personal returnable) in which case the omitted material was made to protect persons OTHER than Richard Nixon, such as his family and other persons in Washington.

    President Nixon said, “I understand, and the censors cut the conversation there? because the next word is most likely a name in a list of names of people President Nixon knew to be homosexuals. This is consistent with the reasons that the censors have given for the outtakes, that is personal information regarding persons yet living.
    it’s very likely that what Nixon said went something like this, I don’t mind the homosexuality, I understand —- —– is a homosexual, ———- is a homo and so is ———, and they’re all good public servants, but nevertheless . . .

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