BREAKING: Christian Wingnuts Upset With Academy Awards

ZOMG! Wingnuts not happy with Sean Penn winning an Oscar. Developing….

The Academy Awards showed its support for sexual perversions last night at its annual Oscar ceremony.

And, the Academy wrongly painted the Entertainment Industry as a bunch of Commie rats, as it applauded Communist sympathizer Sean Penn’s gleeful greeting after winning an award for portraying an assassinated homosexual leader, “You Commie, homo-loving sons of guns!”…

The audience also clapped when the winning screenwriter for MILK, Dustin Lance Black, proclaimed his bigotry when he commented, “If Harvey had not been taken from us 30 years ago, I think he would want me to say to all the gay and lesbian kids out there tonight who have been told they are less than by the churches, by the government, by their families, that you are beautiful, wonderful creatures of value, and that no matter what anyone tells you, God does love you and that very soon, I promise you, you will have equal rights, federally, across this great nation of ours. Thank you, God, for Harvey Milk!”

At the beginning of the show, host Hugh Jackman described the message of MILK as, “It’s okay to be gay.”

Of course, Jesus Christ believes otherwise.

Question of the Day

What are you reading?

I read about a dozen books in January. The number of books I’ve read in February is 0. Zero. I’ve been stuck on The Archer’s Tale since my trip out to Vegas and although it’s not a bad book and in fact I actually liked what I had read, I just haven’t been inspired to pick it up and finish it. And I don’t even have any books on deck that I’m motivated to pick up and read. (Actually, I do have Necroscope in my bag which I hear is pretty good but I just haven’t been able to talk myself to read yet). I’m blaming PVS (Post-Vegas Stress) although it could also be my MWM (Mid-Winter Malaise) although I wouldn’t rule out TWS (The Wire Syndrome) which has been keeping me up for the past few nights (I finished Season One. And I agree with what others have said, Omar Little is one of the best characters ever on TV. Lester Freamon was an early starter but gets played out fast in Season 1)

Naming the beams for Dana Farber patients

From Boston.com:

It has become a beloved ritual at Dana-Farber: Every day, children who come to the clinic write their names on sheets of paper and tape them to the windows of the walkway for ironworkers to see. And, every day, the ironworkers paint the names onto I-beams and hoist them into place as they add floors to the new 14-story Yawkey Center for Cancer Care.

(via LouiseHornor)

Dumping Phelps Over Bong Rip Damages Kellogg’s Brand Reputation

From Business Insider:

When Kellogg announced it would not renew its endorsement contract with Olympic medalist Michael Phelps after a photo of the athelete smoking pot surfaced, it may have cost the food company its sterling reputation, reports company reputation index Vanno.

Out of the 5,600 company reputations Vanno monitors, Kellogg ranked ninth before it booted Phelps. Now it’s ranked 83. Not even an industry-wide peanut scare inflicted as much damage on the food company’s reputation.

About Ask Metafilter

Slate’s profile of AskMeFi:

Which is why I am so impressed with Ask MetaFilter, a question-and-answer site that grew out of the MetaFilter community in 2003. It’s one of the few places on the Internet where you can find sensible, accommodating, actually helpful discussion. For example, last October, the user “Hands of Manos” posed the following query: “How can I be less cynical?” He went on to explain, “I hate most movies, I lost faith in the God I was raised to believe in as a child and I find very little joy in most things now a days” and noted, “My wife is pissed because I’m so negative and doubtful of everything.”

Thoughtful replies were posted immediately, with suggestions ranging from volunteering to banjo playing to avoiding “emotionally toxic” people to reading David McCullough’s book on John Adams to looking at a blog that collects examples of how the world is getting better all the time. Many of the replies hit the sweet spot of being thoughtful in a nonoverbearing way: “I’m a firm believer that it’s almost impossible to consciously change your attitudes (maybe even a little arrogant to try). Get out of your bad routine/loop of doing things that make you act cynical, and eventually your attitudes will change.” The thread also had a nice sub-thread about how cynicism can lead to skepticism, a potentially good point of view.

Maricopa, AZ

From The Wall Street Journal:

Builders rushed into this one-time agricultural crossroads during the housing boom. They put up beige stucco houses on winding streets, with names like Heavenly Place and Good Vibrations Lane. They lured young people who couldn’t afford homes in nearby Phoenix or its costly suburbs. The population soared to 37,000 last year from 1,400 a decade ago, making Maricopa one of the nation’s fastest-growing towns.

Now, it’s become a dead end for some of those people.

“We’re trapped,” says Tracy Campbell, as she watches her 2-year-old daughter romp on a playground.

In 2005, her husband, Zachary Campbell, accepted a transfer from San Diego to Phoenix to manage a recreational-vehicle store. For the first time, the Campbells figured, they could afford their own home, though that meant moving to Maricopa, about 20 miles from Mr. Campbell’s store. They scraped together a $50,000 down payment to buy a new four-bedroom home in Maricopa, for $250,000. It came with black granite countertops, cherry kitchen cabinets and a pool in back.

Today, Ms. Campbell figures, the home is worth perhaps half what they paid in 2005.

Even that might be optimistic. Along a nearby highway, young men hired by a local real estate brokerage wave red signs touting “Homes From $69.9 K.”

The Campbells planned to sell their house for a profit after a few years and move back to San Diego before their daughter starts kindergarten. Today, they couldn’t hope to sell the house for enough to pay off the mortgage. They fear the down payment they made on the house is money they won’t see again.

Some people in the neighborhood are simply walking away from their houses, leaving them for the lenders to foreclose. “We’re surrounded by empty houses on three sides,” Ms. Campbell says. But she and her husband have kept up on their payments, and want to keep their credit record clean.