Scene from “Night of 1000 Cats”

From Wikipedia:

A playboy serial killer (Stiglitz) seduces beautiful women under false pretenses, inviting them to his ranch/castle, to proceed to kill them in gruesome ways. He uses the flesh of these women to feed a great number of cats that he keeps in a pit, and keeps their heads as trophies, picked inside glass jars. However, one woman he attempts to kill escapes. He runs after her, but falls into the pit, to be attacked and devoured by the cats.

Your Little Friend the Fifth Grade Book

From Bookofshortstories.com:

This thin, pocket-sized book — no title on its cover — whose brittle pages made soft crackling protests when opened easily drew me into its long-gone world. I’d expected an accountant’s ledger, columns of faded numbers, given its drab earthy brown-green cover, but to my delight instead there on the inside flap was a bookplate bearing “Harry W” carefully penciled in beginner’s cursive. The next page proclaimed this the “Book of Short Stories” with the oddly enticing notice “printed and bound under supervision of K.E. Killeen, Director of Handiwork”. Perhaps you’ve met a “Director of Handiwork”, but I have not. The next page obligingly revealed all by way of a peppily sweet introduction which began with this greeting:

How do you do! I am the little book that you have made.

This at least explained what I held: a collection of stories written by fifth graders. It ended with the date: February 18, 1931.

I can only speak for myself, but kid’s writings are always revealing and a great find, but that a school district published, during the Great Depression no less, a collection of fifth grader’s stories, book reports, and odd poems struck me as, well, it struck me. In a great way.

Here then are all of the stories found in this 63-page book. There are 86 in all. Some no more than four or five sentences, others span pages, but charmers all, some offering a few sweet surprises. At times the excercise of making this site felt like a typing or stenography test, I have tried to leave in only the book’s typos and odd punctuations, but have probably introduced a few of my own: forgive me.

(via Metafilter)

Deletionpedia

Collecting deleted wikipedia pages:

Deletionpedia is an archive of about 63,551 pages which have been deleted from the English-language Wikipedia.

Deletionpedia is not a wiki: you cannot edit the pages uploaded here. An automated bot uploads pages as they are deleted from Wikipedia.

I clicked the random button and got this:

Devan pignatelli

devan pignatelli is a great kid who loves to play outside, whatch horror films such as the film’s childs play, halloween, friady the 13th, grimlins, and dead silence. he is a smart boy who is playing baseball along with his friend hunter. he would love to have a myspace page but his mom wont let him. he just sits around and plays video games with his brother riley. he has a hard time in school and is realy not a bad kid,…………… but he is mischevious. he has a lot of talent. he hopes one day to be a realy good author and surprise the world with his talents. he has had a lot of stressfull moments, but he can realy do anything he sets his heart on. he would love if he could meet someone who actulay liked what he did every deay after school. he is off at a good start and hopes to continue that life.

Sally Hemings in Paris

From The Root:

In this excerpt of “The Hemingses of Monticello,” author Annette Gordon-Reed examines how Sally Hemings and her brother, the chef James Hemings, enjoyed the cosmopolitan lifestyle of Paris in the 1770s while living with Thomas Jefferson during his stint as Ambassador to France. Teenaged Sally gets her own pay and taste of freedom that eluded her back home in Virginia.

Sept. 22, 2008–The home that Sally Hemings moved to was just inside the city limits of Paris. The Hôtel de Langeac was right next to the Grille de Chaillot, one of the many gated entry points into what was still at the time a walled city. The house, abutting the Champs-Elysées and along the rue Neuve de Berri, was more expensive than Jefferson could afford. He thought, however, that his position demanded a suitable residence for all the entertaining that he expected to do.

This residence was truly worthy of a French aristocrat. The expansive grounds entered by a way of an impressive courtyard, contained “green houses,” an extensive kitchen garden, and another “graceful” one that Jefferson pronounced “clever.” Just off the entryway into the courtyard were the porter’s lodge and servants’ quarters.

Living at such a place gave both Sally and her brother James Hemingses ample opportunity to compare their surroundings in Paris with those they had seen in Virginia, and they could only have found Virginian residences wanting. The amenity of having indoor bathrooms was remarkable for both them and the Jeffersons.. The very complexity of the house, with its multiple stairways (one large formal one and two smaller private ones) and its numerous passageways leading into different areas of the mansion, no doubt piqued their interest as well.

Fury at $2.5bn bonus for Lehman’s New York staff

From The Independent:

Up to 10,000 staff at the New York office of the bankrupt investment bank Lehman Brothers will share a bonus pool set aside for them that is worth $2.5bn (£1.4bn), Barclays Bank, which is buying the business, confirmed last night.

The revelation sparked fury among the workers’ former colleagues, Lehman’s 5,000 staff based in London, who currently have no idea how long they will go on receiving even their basic salaries, let alone any bonus payments. It also prompted a renewed backlash over the compensation culture in global finance, with critics claiming that many bankers receive pay and rewards that bore no relation to the job they had done.

A spokesman for Barclays said the $2.5bn bonus pool in New York had been set aside before Lehman Brothers filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy in the United States a week ago. Barclays has agreed that the fund should continue to be ring-fenced now it has taken control of Lehman’s US business, a deal agreed by American bankruptcy courts over the weekend.