Daily Dose of Ingersoll

RobertGIngersoll.jpg

If it is important for us to know that he was the Son of God,
I say, then, that it devolves upon God to give us the evidence. Let
him write it across the face of the heavens, in every language of
mankind. If it is necessary for us to believe it, let it grow on
every leaf next year. No man should be damned for not believing,
unless the evidence is overwhelming. And he ought not to be made to
depend upon say so, or upon “as was supposed.” He should have it
directly, for himself. A man says that God told him a certain
thing, and he tells me, and I have only his word. He may have been
deceived. If God has a message for me he ought to tell it to me,
and not to somebody that has been dead four or five thousand years,
and in another language.

Besides, God may have changed his mind on many things; he has
on slavery, and polygamy at least, according to the church; and yet
his church now wants to go and destroy polygamy in Utah with the
sword. Why do they not send missionaries there with copies of the
Old Testament? By reading the lives of Abraham and Isaac, and Lot,
and a few other patriarchs who ought to have been in the
penitentiary, maybe they can soften their hearts.

Robert Green Ingersoll – “Orthodoxy”(1884)

Daily Dose of Ingersoll

RobertGIngersoll.jpg

There is another miracle I do not believe, — the
resurrection. I want to speak about it as we would about any
ordinary transaction. In the first place, I do not believe that any
miracle was ever performed, and if there was, you cannot prove it.
Why? Because it is altogether more reasonable to believe that the
people were mistaken about it than that it happened. And why?
Because, according to human experience, we know that people will
not always tell the truth, and we never saw a miracle ourselves,
and we must be governed by our experience; and if we go by our
experience, we must say that the miracle never happened — that the
witnesses were mistaken.

Robert Green Ingersoll – “Orthodoxy”(1884)