Sister says 3 died doing what they loved: drinking, driving fast

From the Rocky Mountain News:

A sister of one of three people killed early Friday in Louisville said it “really isn’t a shock to any of us” that her brother died in a high-speed crash.

“The thing that really makes me feel much better about this is they died doing what they loved to do — they were drinking, they were going fast and they were together,” Lorie Flaherty said. “It gives me comfort, it does, to know those three things.”

Her comments, first published in the Daily Camera over the weekend, set off a firestorm of comments on the newspaper’s Web site.

SciFi and the Statue of Liberty

From Gerry Canavan:

While writing the post, in connection with Ryan’s theory that the most salient feature of apocalypse in science fiction is the way in which the same images are simply repackaged for us over and over again, I was struck by the recurrence of a ruined Statue of Liberty as perhaps the quintessential icon of disaster since the 1940s. So struck, in fact, that I began to obsessively collect these images from the ‘net wherever I could find them. Submitted for your approval, the fruits of my labor:

Typical Breakfasts by World Regions

From Wikipedia:

Indonesia

Indonesian breakfasts usually contain rice in some form. Some common dishes are nasi goreng, lontong sayur (rice cake wrapped in banana leaf with vegetables and coconut milk soup), and gado gado. In Jakarta nasi uduk would be served which consists of spiced milk and steamed rice served with fried fish or fried chicken, sliced cucumber, and sambal. Many Indonesians also enjoy bakmie ayam (chicken noodle) as well as an assortment of cakes in the morning.

The Martin Luther King You Don’t See on TV

From Fair.org:

What TV viewers see is a closed loop of familiar file footage: King battling desegregation in Birmingham (1963); reciting his dream of racial harmony at the rally in Washington (1963); marching for voting rights in Selma, Alabama (1965); and finally, lying dead on the motel balcony in Memphis (1968).

An alert viewer might notice that the chronology jumps from 1965 to 1968. Yet King didn’t take a sabbatical near the end of his life. In fact, he was speaking and organizing as diligently as ever.

Almost all of those speeches were filmed or taped. But they’re not shown today on TV.

Why?

It’s because national news media have never come to terms with what Martin Luther King Jr. stood for during his final years.

In the early 1960s, when King focused his challenge on legalized racial discrimination in the South, most major media were his allies. Network TV and national publications graphically showed the police dogs and bullwhips and cattle prods used against Southern blacks who sought the right to vote or to eat at a public lunch counter.

But after passage of civil rights acts in 1964 and 1965, King began challenging the nation’s fundamental priorities. He maintained that civil rights laws were empty without “human rights” — including economic rights. For people too poor to eat at a restaurant or afford a decent home, King said, anti-discrimination laws were hollow.

Noting that a majority of Americans below the poverty line were white, King developed a class perspective. He decried the huge income gaps between rich and poor, and called for “radical changes in the structure of our society” to redistribute wealth and power.

“True compassion,” King declared, “is more than flinging a coin to a beggar; it comes to see that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring.”

By 1967, King had also become the country’s most prominent opponent of the Vietnam War, and a staunch critic of overall U.S. foreign policy, which he deemed militaristic. In his “Beyond Vietnam” speech delivered at New York’s Riverside Church on April 4, 1967 — a year to the day before he was murdered — King called the United States “the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today.”

From Vietnam to South Africa to Latin America, King said, the U.S. was “on the wrong side of a world revolution.” King questioned “our alliance with the landed gentry of Latin America,” and asked why the U.S. was suppressing revolutions “of the shirtless and barefoot people” in the Third World, instead of supporting them.

In foreign policy, King also offered an economic critique, complaining about “capitalists of the West investing huge sums of money in Asia, Africa and South America, only to take the profits out with no concern for the social betterment of the countries.”

You haven’t heard the “Beyond Vietnam” speech on network news retrospectives, but national media heard it loud and clear back in 1967 — and loudly denounced it. Time magazine called it “demagogic slander that sounded like a script for Radio Hanoi.” The Washington Post patronized that “King has diminished his usefulness to his cause, his country, his people.”

(via Reddit)

Guess the films from the Christian parenting websites descriptions

From The Guardian:

“Profanity is extreme with 40 ‘f-words’. Sexual humour abounds and includes a scene of a man masturbating, others scenes of implied oral sex, and an extended scene dealing with a man who’s got his privates stuck in his zipper. In other scenes, the ‘villains’ give a woman’s dog amphetamines and barbiturates (at different times). Beyond doing that to the dog, it’s also electrocuted (trying to revive it, but also catching it on fire) and wrestled with (in a slapstick fashion).”

(via Arbroath)