Steve Balmer’s Zune Commercial

(And for those who never saw Balmer’s dance…. Oh hell, and Developers Developers Developers Developers…)

Update:

Apparently the video was made by a former Microsoft employee. I say former because:

If you’re sitting at your desk, staring out of the window and wishing you were running around in the sun, spare a thought for one Microsoft employee who will soon be doing just that. Permanently.

The japester appears to have used an internal Microsoft website to direct, well, just about anyone to this re-reinterpretation of Steve Ballmer’s infamous monkeyboy dance. Or is it a re-reinterpetation of Apple’s iPod advertising campaign? In these mashed-up days, it’s hard to tell.

List of Deficient or Obsolete Bridges By State

Nevermind our ailing infrastructure, we have democracy to force down the throats of middle eastern nations dammit!

As of 2005, 155,144 of the nation’s 592,473 bridges or 26.2 percent, were rated structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. A structurally deficient bridge is closed or restricted to light vehicles because of its deteriorated structural components. While not necessarily unsafe, these bridges must have limits for speed and weight. A functionally obsolete bridge has older design features and, while it is not unsafe for all vehicles, it cannot safely accommodate current traffic volumes, and vehicle sizes and weights.

Democrats Bend Over For Bush

From the Washington Post:

The Senate bowed to White House pressure last night and passed a Republican plan for overhauling the federal government’s terrorist surveillance laws, approving changes that would temporarily give U.S. spy agencies expanded power to eavesdrop on foreign suspects without a court order.

The 60 to 28 vote, which was quickly denounced by civil rights and privacy advocates, came after Democrats in the House failed to win support for more modest changes that would have required closer court supervision of government surveillance. Earlier in the day, President Bush threatened to hold Congress in session into its scheduled summer recess if it did not approve the changes he wanted.

The legislation, which is expected to go before the House today, would expand the government’s authority to intercept without a court order the phone calls and e-mails of people in the United States who are communicating with people overseas.

Here are the Democrats who voted for the bill (all Republicans voted for it)

No Republicans voted against the bill. The following Democrats voted for it: Evan Bayh (Indiana); Tom Carper (Delaware); Bob Casey (Pennsylvania); Kent Conrad (North Dakota); Dianne Feinstein (California); Daniel Inouye (Hawai‘i); Amy Klobuchar (Minnesota); Nancy Mary Landrieu (Louisiana); Blanche Lincoln (Arkansas); Claire McCaskill (Missouri); Barbara Mikulski (Maryland); Bill Nelson (Florida); Ben Nelson (Nebraska); Mark Pryor (Arkansas); Ken Salazar (Colorado); Jim Webb (Virginia).

Senators Joe Biden, Hillary Clinton, Christopher Dodd and Barack Obama all opposed the bill, as did 23 other Democrats and Bernie Sanders, the independent from Vermont. Joe Lieberman voted …well, you know how he voted.