The African Cookbook


The African Cookbook
:

African cooking, like Africa itself, now embodies elements of several cultures- Arab, European, and Asian as well as black African. It is varied, it is interesting, and it is delicious. And food in Africa is perhaps more important in everyday social relations than it is in western cultures. African hospitality is without parallel anywhere else in the world. In many parts of Africa the arrival of a guest is followed almost automatically by the offering of food. It is an insult not to offer it, and, even if one is not hungry, it is an insult not to accept. The recipes in this book are authentic, or as authentic as they need to be for American cooks. (Few readers will ever have to grind their own flour or prepare a goat from the hoof for the table.) The book itself is well organized and is full of useful suggestions. It has passed the scrutiny of the ladies on my staff, who like to cook, like to eat, and have been to Africa themselves.

(via Information Junk)

6 Comments

  1. Very cool, I’ve gotta check that out… I’m a pretty avid home cook (been looking around to try set up a food blog for a while actually), but haven’t gotten into African food at all…

  2. “African hospitality is without parallel anywhere else in the world. In many parts of Africa the arrival of a guest is followed almost automatically by the offering of food. It is an insult not to offer it, and, even if one is not hungry, it is an insult not to accept”.

    Subsitute “African” with any European nationality east of France and it’s pretty paralleled in the hospitality department.

  3. This page must be dated–the “tef” (teff) flour for making injera is very much available in America these days; I think Bob’s Red Mill sells it (in natural foods stores and on the ‘Net). Recipes for authentic injera are also out on the web.

    It would be nice to find pre-made berbere (the spice mixture) because making it at home is involved; normally it’s made up in large quantities in Ethiopia.

  4. Folks, you’ve been eating “African” food without knowing it for years. Cooking techniques and certain foods have just made their way into American culture over time…

  5. I always wondered how to cook pygmy meat, a special current delicacy of the Congo. Liberia also has “enemy’s heart pate” that is known to be quite tasty, and it is not only an insult not to eat it, you may be shot as an insurgent.

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