The Blasphemy Challenge

The Rational Response Squad is giving away 1001 DVDs of The God Who Wasn’t There, the hit documentary that the Los Angeles Times calls “provocative — to put it mildly.”

There’s only one catch: We want your soul.

It’s simple. You record a short message damning yourself to Hell, you upload it to YouTube, and then the Rational Response Squad will send you a free The God Who Wasn’t There DVD. It’s that easy.

Update:

The Xians strike back:

We need to be praying for the lost people in this nation.We need to band together and pray! We need to lift up our voices as one body, This Friday between 12:00pm and 1:00pm we are asking you to stop what you are doing for at least 15 minutes and pray for this nation, for all those that are lost. We want to lift up this those that have been doing the Blasphemy Challenge. It is groups of people, young and old, that have been blaspheming God, wanting to commit there lives to Satan. We need to pray for these people.

Dracula’s Castle for Sale

From the Telegraph:

Say what you will about his personal habits, but when it comes to spinning gore into gold, Vlad the Impaler, enthusiastic champion of man’s inhumanity to man, can be said to have few rivals.

The 15th-century tyrant – the inspiration for Bram Stoker’s Count Dracula – is known to have resided at Bran Castle, near Brasov in Transylvania, as either pampered guest or shackled inmate, according to conflicting reports.

What is indisputable is that the imposing, 14th-century fortress-turned-museum has never baulked from cashing in on its association with bad lad Vlad, whose preferred mode of execution secured his place in history. Today, it is for sale at a spine-chilling £40 million.

(via The Daily Drip)

The Murky World of High-Fructose Corn Syrup

HFCS has the exact same sweetness and taste as an equal amount of sucrose from cane or beet sugar but it is obviously much more complicated to make, involving vats of murky fermenting liquid, fungus and chemical tweaking, all of which take place in one of 16 chemical plants located in the Corn Belt. Yet in spite of all the special enzymes required, HFCS is actually cheaper than sugar. It is also very easy to transport–it’s just piped into tanker trucks. This translates into lower costs and higher profits for food producers.

The development of the HFCS process came at an opportune time for corn growers. Refinements of the partial hydrogenation process had made it possible to get better shortenings and margarines out of soybeans than corn. HFCS took up the slack as demand for corn oil margarine declined. Lysine, an amino acid, can be produced from the corn residue after the glucose is removed. This is the modus operandi of the food conglomerates–break down commodities into their basic components and then put them back together again as processed food.

Related:

Wikipedia’s entry for High fructose corn syrup.

A list of foods containing hfcs.