Steve’s Weird House

Stephen resides in a Victorian home that is a cluttered combination of museum, library and art gallery, decorated with that old-world Addam’s Family charm. Not only is every inch of every wall covered with art, but all the ceilings are also decorated.

Stephen is of course always looking for more oddities or unusual artifacts to add to his museum. He is particularly looking for a perfectly weird woman (artistic, outrageous) to share his weird world with!

Exploring Google’s Hidden Features

I didn’t know some of these:

Google is a great search engine, but it’s also more than that. Google has tons of hidden features, some of which are quite fun and most of which are extremely useful— if you know about them. How do you discover all these hidden features within the Google site? Read on to learn more.

FBI Considered “It’s A Wonderful Life” Communist Propaganda


Wisebread finds an old fbi memo discussing why “It’s a Wonderful Life” is pinko marxist american hating propaganda:

There is submitted herewith the running memorandum concerning Communist infiltration of the motion picture industry which has been brought up to date as of May 26, 1947….

With regard to the picture “It’s a Wonderful Life”, [redacted] stated in substance that the film represented rather obvious attempts to discredit bankers by casting Lionel Barrymore as a “scrooge-type” so that he would be the most hated man in the picture. This, according to these sources, is a common trick used by Communists.

In addition, [redacted] stated that, in his opinion, this picture deliberately maligned the upper class, attempting to show the people who had money were mean and despicable characters. [redacted] related that if he made this picture portraying the banker, he would have shown this individual to have been following the rules as laid down by the State Bank Examiner in connection with making loans. Further, [redacted] stated that the scene wouldn’t have “suffered at all” in portraying the banker as a man who was protecting funds put in his care by private individuals and adhering to the rules governing the loan of that money rather than portraying the part as it was shown. In summary, [redacted] stated that it was not necessary to make the banker such a mean character and “I would never have done it that way.”

(via Boing Boing)

Wii Have a Problem

A site dedicated to damage inflicted by Wii controllers (or the people who swing them like they are swatting flies)

Yet again another baseball accident, my mate had just stated playing when I told him to “get in side the game”, so he stepped up to the plate, with his entire mite he began swinging the Wii mote when the strap broke and the controller broke loss and at almost point blank range smashed the fireplace surroundings.

(Thanks Andrea)

Christmas’ Pagan Origins

Some light holiday reading:

No one knows what day Jesus Christ was born on. From the biblical description, most historians believe that his birth probably occurred in September, approximately six months after Passover. One thing they agree on is that it is very unlikely that Jesus was born in December, since the bible records shepherds tending their sheep in the fields on that night. This is quite unlikely to have happened during a cold Judean winter. So why do we celebrate Christ’s birthday as Christmas, on December the 25th?

The answer lies in the pagan origins of Christmas. In ancient Babylon, the feast of the Son of Isis (Goddess of Nature) was celebrated on December 25. Raucous partying, gluttonous eating and drinking, and gift-giving were traditions of this feast.

In Rome, the Winter Solstice was celebrated many years before the birth of Christ. The Romans called their winter holiday Saturnalia, honoring Saturn, the God of Agriculture. In January, they observed the Kalends of January, which represented the triumph of life over death. This whole season was called Dies Natalis Invicti Solis, the Birthday of the Unconquered Sun. The festival season was marked by much merrymaking. It is in ancient Rome that the tradition of the Mummers was born. The Mummers were groups of costumed singers and dancers who traveled from house to house entertaining their neighbors. From this, the Christmas tradition of caroling was born.