Bletchley Park Recreates Turing Bombe

From the Telegraph:

The last time that the rattle of the Turing Bombe was heard, it was the greatest secret of the British Empire.

Yesterday, it was a press event.

With a rumble that turned into a roar, a sound not heard at Bletchley Park for more than half a century, the machine that was at the heart of Britain’s wartime code-breaking triumph began to work again.

The operation of the bombe was likened by the men and, mostly, women who worked on it to a vast collection of knitting needles, but its sound was also the first hint of the computerised world in which we now live.

Yesterday, a fully-functioning recreation of the bombe was switched on for the first time, by re-enactors in period dress, bringing back to life the great-great uncle of the PC.

Hosting Question

My current host doesn’t seem to be able to handle a movable type blog that has a large number of entries, comments and traffic. As a result, comments are slowing down to a near crawl, posting entries is quickly becoming tedious and archival rebuilds are damn near impossible. Can anybody recommend a good host which is Movable Type friendly? I go through about 150 GB of bandwidth a month and growing and I’m looking for quality over cheap hosting.

The Capsule Inn in Japan

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For only about $35 (4,000 yen) you can sleep in a morgue!

A typical Capsule Hotel is composed of two major sections; a public lounge space including bathing, and the other is a private space where the sleeping rooms (capsules) are arranged. The actual sleeping room is a capsule unit made of reinforced plastic and designed in the image of a jet airplane’s cockpit. In the capsule unit, all the required amenities are provided; TV, radio, alarm clock, adjustable lighting… almost everything is provided! Every device is within your reach and you can control everything in a sleeping position.

(via Neatorama)

The War Prayer

Mark Twain’s short story “The War Prayer” can be read in about a minute here.

“Lord our Father, our young patriots, idols of our hearts, go forth into battle — be Thou near them! With them — in spirit — we also go forth from the sweet peace of our beloved firesides to smite the foe. O Lord our God, help us tear their soldiers to bloody shreds with our shells; help us to cover their smiling fields with the pale forms of their patriot dead; help us to drown the thunder of the guns with the shrieks of their wounded, writhing in pain; help us to lay waste their humble homes with a hurricane of fire; help us to wring the hearts of their unoffending widows with unavailing grief; help us to turn them out roofless with their little children to wander unfriended in the wastes of their desolated land in rags and hunger and thirst, sports of the sun flames in summer and the icy winds of winter, broken in spirit, worn with travail, imploring thee for the refuge of the grave and denied it —

For our sakes who adore Thee, Lord, blast their hopes, blight their lives, protract their bitter pilgrimmage, make heavy their steps, water their way with their tears, strain the white snow with the blood of their wounded feet!

We ask it, in the spirit of love, of Him Who is the Source of Love, and Who is the ever-faithful refuge and friend of all that are sore beset and seek His aid with humble and contrite hearts. Amen.

10 Stingrays Killed Since Irwin’s Death

From LiveScience:

SYDNEY, Australia (AP) _ At least 10 stingrays have been killed since “Crocodile Hunter” Steve Irwin was fatally injured by one of the fish, an official said Tuesday, prompting a spokesman for the late TV star’s animal charity to urge people not take revenge on the animals.

Irwin died last week after a stingray barb pierced his chest as he recorded a show off the Great Barrier Reef.

Stingray bodies since have been discovered on two beaches in Queensland state on Australia’s eastern coast. Two were discovered Tuesday with their tails lopped off, state fisheries department official Wayne Sumpton said.

Sumpton said fishermen who inadvertently catch the diamond-shaped rays sometimes cut off their tails to avoid being stung, but the practice was uncommon. Stingrays often are caught in fishing nets by mistake and should be returned to the sea, Sumpton said.

Michael Hornby, the executive director of Irwin’s Wildlife Warriors conservation group, said he was concerned the rays were being hunted and killed in retaliation for Irwin’s death.