Reviving Woolly Mammoths

mammoth.jpg

From LiveScience.com:

WASHINGTON (AP Descendants of extinct mammals like the giant woolly mammoth might one day walk the Earth again. It isn’t exactly Jurassic Park, but Japanese researchers are looking at the possibility of using sperm from frozen animals to inseminate living relatives.

So far they’ve succeeded with mice some frozen as long as 15 years and lead researcher Dr. Atsuo Ogura says he would like to try experiments in larger animals.

“In this study, the rates of success with sperm from 15 year-frozen bodies were much higher than we expected. So the likelihood of mammoths revival would be higher than we expected before,” Ogura said in an interview via e-mail.

While frozen sperm is commonly used by sperm banks, the team led by Ogura, at Riken Bioresource Center in Ibaraki, Japan, worked with sperm from whole frozen mice and from frozen mouse organs.

“If spermatozoa of extinct mammalian species can be retrieved from animal bodies that were kept frozen for millions of years in permafrost, live animals might be restored by injecting them into (eggs) from females of closely related species,” the researchers said in a paper appearing in Tuesday’s issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Reviving Woolly Mammoths

mammoth.jpg

From LiveScience.com:

WASHINGTON (AP Descendants of extinct mammals like the giant woolly mammoth might one day walk the Earth again. It isn’t exactly Jurassic Park, but Japanese researchers are looking at the possibility of using sperm from frozen animals to inseminate living relatives.

So far they’ve succeeded with mice some frozen as long as 15 years and lead researcher Dr. Atsuo Ogura says he would like to try experiments in larger animals.

“In this study, the rates of success with sperm from 15 year-frozen bodies were much higher than we expected. So the likelihood of mammoths revival would be higher than we expected before,” Ogura said in an interview via e-mail.

While frozen sperm is commonly used by sperm banks, the team led by Ogura, at Riken Bioresource Center in Ibaraki, Japan, worked with sperm from whole frozen mice and from frozen mouse organs.

“If spermatozoa of extinct mammalian species can be retrieved from animal bodies that were kept frozen for millions of years in permafrost, live animals might be restored by injecting them into (eggs) from females of closely related species,” the researchers said in a paper appearing in Tuesday’s issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  • Anonymous

    ok, do you listen to canadian radio or something? they were talking about the appolo 11 tapes and then the mammoth, and i come here and you do the same!

  • Hmmm. Wouldn’t you end up with a Mammophant and not a Mammoth? I don’t know but I suspect that one would have to go into the DNA and engineer/clone the new animal rather than just impregnate an elephant egg. However I read on Wikipedia that someone has isolated the gene that determined if a Mammoth was a blonde or brunette, so if they ever do clone one, we can get our new large pets to match the couch.