Who Has Killed More, Satan or God?

God killed 2,038,334 compared to Satan’s 10.

In a previous post, I counted the number of people that were killed by the God in the Bible. I came up with 2,038,334, which, of course, greatly underestimates God’s total death toll, since it only includes those killings for which specific numbers are given. No attempt was made to include the victims of Noah’s flood, Sodom and Gomorrah, or the many plagues, famines, fiery serpents, etc., with which the good book is filled. Still, 2 million is a respectable number even for world class killers.

But how does this compare with Satan? How many did he kill in the Bible?

Here is the post listing the verses in the bible which lists God’s victims.
(via J-Walk)

The World From An RC Airplane

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This web page is the culmination of the “A Day In The Life of AP – 1/1/2005” project. It was conceived and performed by members from around the world of the aerial photography forum on rcgroups.com. Each entrant for this project agreed to post a photograph taken on January 1, 2005 using their radio controlled aerial photography aircraft. Along with the photo was posted pertinent information such as location, weather, aircraft, camera and in most cases a description of the event. When the situation did not allow for an aerial photo, such as bad weather, a ground photo was allowed.

A-bombed Ginkgo trees in Hiroshima, Japan

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At the end of World War II on August 6, 1945 an atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima by the Americans. The plants and trees in the area around the epicentre were examined in September 1945. Among the survivors were the four Ginkgo biloba trees shown on this page. They were situated near the blast center and appeared to bud after the blast without major deformations and are still alive today.

(via del.icio.us/valis)

Reviving Woolly Mammoths

mammoth.jpg

From LiveScience.com:

WASHINGTON (AP Descendants of extinct mammals like the giant woolly mammoth might one day walk the Earth again. It isn’t exactly Jurassic Park, but Japanese researchers are looking at the possibility of using sperm from frozen animals to inseminate living relatives.

So far they’ve succeeded with mice some frozen as long as 15 years and lead researcher Dr. Atsuo Ogura says he would like to try experiments in larger animals.

“In this study, the rates of success with sperm from 15 year-frozen bodies were much higher than we expected. So the likelihood of mammoths revival would be higher than we expected before,” Ogura said in an interview via e-mail.

While frozen sperm is commonly used by sperm banks, the team led by Ogura, at Riken Bioresource Center in Ibaraki, Japan, worked with sperm from whole frozen mice and from frozen mouse organs.

“If spermatozoa of extinct mammalian species can be retrieved from animal bodies that were kept frozen for millions of years in permafrost, live animals might be restored by injecting them into (eggs) from females of closely related species,” the researchers said in a paper appearing in Tuesday’s issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Reviving Woolly Mammoths

mammoth.jpg

From LiveScience.com:

WASHINGTON (AP Descendants of extinct mammals like the giant woolly mammoth might one day walk the Earth again. It isn’t exactly Jurassic Park, but Japanese researchers are looking at the possibility of using sperm from frozen animals to inseminate living relatives.

So far they’ve succeeded with mice some frozen as long as 15 years and lead researcher Dr. Atsuo Ogura says he would like to try experiments in larger animals.

“In this study, the rates of success with sperm from 15 year-frozen bodies were much higher than we expected. So the likelihood of mammoths revival would be higher than we expected before,” Ogura said in an interview via e-mail.

While frozen sperm is commonly used by sperm banks, the team led by Ogura, at Riken Bioresource Center in Ibaraki, Japan, worked with sperm from whole frozen mice and from frozen mouse organs.

“If spermatozoa of extinct mammalian species can be retrieved from animal bodies that were kept frozen for millions of years in permafrost, live animals might be restored by injecting them into (eggs) from females of closely related species,” the researchers said in a paper appearing in Tuesday’s issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.