The Geography of Slavery in Virginia

The Geography of Slavery in Virginia is a digital collection of advertisements for runaway and captured slaves and servants in 18th- and 19th-century Virginia newspapers. Building on the rich descriptions of individual slaves and servants in the ads, the project offers a personal, geographical and documentary context for the study of slavery in Virginia, from colonial times to the Civil War.

(via del.icio.us/dzisk)

The Geography of Slavery in Virginia

The Geography of Slavery in Virginia is a digital collection of advertisements for runaway and captured slaves and servants in 18th- and 19th-century Virginia newspapers. Building on the rich descriptions of individual slaves and servants in the ads, the project offers a personal, geographical and documentary context for the study of slavery in Virginia, from colonial times to the Civil War.

(via del.icio.us/dzisk)

The Men Before Superman

From The Trades:

You all know the story about how two idealistic teenagers in the 1930s created a science fiction hero that spawned an industry. Jerry and Joe, in a flash of brilliance, gave the world Superman. Faster than a speeding bullet. More powerful than a locomotive. He was a hero the likes of which the world had never seen before.

Or was he?

There are few science fiction aficionados not familiar with Lester Dent’s creation, Doc Savage. When comparing Savage and Superman, it doesn’t require much of a stretch to see the resemblances between “The Man Of Bronze” and “The Man Of Steel”. Both had keen minds. Both were named Clark. Both had a “fortress of solitude” — Savage’s in the Arctic, Superman’s in the Antarctic. Dent’s Savage was even publicized as “a superman” in the house ads promoting the tales. Published in the early-to-mid 1930’s, it is readily admitted that Doc Savage was a strong influence on the teenage Siegel and Shuster when they created the Last Son of Krypton.

There was, however, another champion to contend with, an older one who was a lot closer to being Superman than Clark Savage ever was.

An uninhibited Superman? Wylie’s Gladiator was published in 1930, eight years before the Man of Steel.Meet Hugo Danner. He can leap 40 feet into the air; bend steel in his bare hands. Nothing short of a bursting shell can penetrate his invulnerable skin. Sound familiar?